Mar Mar Superstar
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The Only Way Out

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I feel this.

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emdot
14 hours ago
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word(s).
San Luis Obispo, CA
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Incoming Calls

4 Comments and 9 Shares
I wonder if that friendly lady ever fixed the problem she was having with her headset.
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emdot
3 days ago
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Real life, again.
San Luis Obispo, CA
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3 public comments
JayM
16 days ago
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Hey! I am that one friend!
Atlanta, GA
alt_text_bot
17 days ago
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I wonder if that friendly lady ever fixed the problem she was having with her headset.
alt_text_at_your_service
17 days ago
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I wonder if that friendly lady ever fixed the problem she was having with her headset.

Internal Monologues

7 Comments and 14 Shares
Haha, just kidding, everyone's already been hacked. I wonder if today's the day we find out about it.
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emdot
3 days ago
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Real life.
San Luis Obispo, CA
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6 public comments
ChrisDL
8 days ago
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yarp
New York
DaftDoki
8 days ago
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Yeah, thats about right.
Seattle
farktronix
8 days ago
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The fact that trees are made of air has been bothering me for years now.
Sunnyvale, CA, USA
redson
6 days ago
it drives me nuts also when people lose fat they do it through breathing
satadru
8 days ago
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Medicine is more about looking at people and having your internal dialogue automatically start to list possible disease states.
New York, NY
alt_text_at_your_service
8 days ago
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Haha, just kidding, everyone's already been hacked. I wonder if today's the day we find out about it.
alt_text_bot
8 days ago
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Haha, just kidding, everyone's already been hacked. I wonder if today's the day we find out about it.

Harassment, Redress & Roman Law

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It seems as if, on the internet, harm can be done to others immediately, continuously, thoughtlessly, and unceasingly, and worse, without consequence to the perpetrator, who enjoys only satisfaction, righteousness, and immunity. It seems that a willingness to participate in conversations online is an implicit agreement to be subjected to harassment and abuse. Countless people–let me just say, most people I know with active online lives–have suffered this. People have committed suicide because of this abuse, old and young, but especially the young; countless people have withdrawn from both the online and offline world after having been subjected to online bullying; the victims, most often coming from the most vulnerable, protected groups, continue to suffer and retreat further from the full embrace of the world and its possibilities.

Those who suffer from racism, sexism, harassment and a daily parade of micro-aggressions have no recourse under any company’s Terms of Service, not to mention the law, unless an actual assault has taken place–and as is well documented, few of those cases are prosecuted, and of those, a vanishingly small number result in conviction. The punishments mostly accrue to the victim reporting the crime.

Online, in the various communities I’ve participated in, built and managed, I’ve written a half dozen Community Guidelines, and spent countless hours thinking through this problem. I’ve kicked countless perps off a dozen web sites, banned, muted and used secret troll-thwarting ninja techniques to perma-ban awful people using robust, well designed admin interfaces. I’ve even reported bad actors to the FBI.  I couldn’t think of how, under the law, the people who suffer from these agonies could be protected from, or receive redress from the thugs whose wrongs they had endured.  But today I happened upon an article about sexual harassment and Roman law, which presented a vision of the law that I hadn’t thought possible: Here’s what it said.

From its earliest codification in the Twelve Tables of 450BC, Roman law gave people a right to recover damages for personal injury.

The law expanded over the centuries to protect an increasingly wide range of personal rights by means of an action known as the actio injuriarum (or action for injuries). By the time of the publication of the Digest of Justinian in 533AD, the action protected three groups of rights:corpus (bodily integrity), fama (reputation), and dignitas (dignity).

This is where the major difference lies between our English-based law of torts and Roman law: although the law of torts allows a plaintiff to sue for bodily injury and defamation, it offers no protection for dignity and therefore no right to sue for verbal insult, no matter how offensive.

The actio injuriarum lives on in modern legal systems. A good example is South Africa, whose legal system is based on Roman law. There, the action has been used to recover damages for sexist verbal insults, unwelcome propositioning for sexual intercourse, and unwelcome exposure to pornography. The action also protects privacy, so it has been used to recover damages in cases involving peeping Toms, stalking, and the publication of intimate facts about people’s private lives.

 



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emdot
18 days ago
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San Luis Obispo, CA
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“I read a lot on the subject.  I studied the texts.  And I...

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“I read a lot on the subject.  I studied the texts.  And I decided it was permissible to take it off, so that’s what I did.  My mom was terrified of what people would think.  She asked me to delete all our mutual friends on Facebook.  She said if I didn’t wear the hijab, then I couldn’t live at home.  So I packed four big bags and went to live with a friend.  It was the first time I’d ever slept out of my house.  Over the next few weeks, I sent my parents messages every single day.  I always told them where I was, what I was doing, and who I was with.  I wanted to show that I forgave them, and that I was still their girl, and that one day things would be normal again.  They didn’t respond for three months.  Until one holiday my uncle called and invited me home for dinner.  My parents started crying as soon as I walked in the door.  They’d prepared a huge meal.  They said that they didn’t mean it, and that they love me a lot, and that they’re proud of me.  Things are very good now.  We get along even better than when I obeyed.  They see I’m doing great things with my freedom.  I have a great job and I travel.  They’re very proud.  I’ve learned to do what you want in life.  Because if you do, the world will change to match you.”  
(Alexandria, Egypt)

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emdot
28 days ago
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Courage.
San Luis Obispo, CA
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Trump supporter demanded to see a list of impeachable offenses; someone happily obliged

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Reader exchange from the Los Angeles Times:

SEP 08, 2018 To the editor [of the Los Angeles Times]: I hear many people say that Trump should be impeached for high crimes and misdemeanors, but where’s the list of constitutionally impeachable offenses? Let’s see the list, please.

The polarization between the two parties is not because of Trump — it is because of Obama, who acted as though America needed to be brought down a peg or two. With statements like “you didn’t build that,” he not so subtly told people that their efforts were not that important.

Now we have someone in the White House who encourages people. It is a huge difference.

For the record, I am a woman who has a doctorate, and I support Trump.

Andrea Anderson, Glassell Park

SEP 12, 2018 To the editor: One letter writer doubts President Trump has committed any impeachable offenses and wonders what they could possibly be. A partial list:

Abuse of power: Trump has sought to use the Justice Department to punish his political foes and pressured the department to go easy on candidates he favors.

Obstruction of justice: He admitted that the Russia inquiry was on his mind when he fired FBI Director James Comey. He has dangled the possibility of pardons to squelch potential witness testimony and tampered with the jury in the Paul Manafort trial by speaking out.

Violated his oath of office: The Constitution requires presidents to see that the laws be faithfully executed. Trump has delighted in undermining not only immigration statutes but also Obamacare.

Impeachable offenses needn’t rise to the level of federal crimes. It is necessary only to show that Trump used his office in ways that are inconsistent with his constitutional duties.

Brad Bonhall, Reno

Image: DonkeyHotey/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

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emdot
36 days ago
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Shared in case you need to share this list on your myriad of social media channels.
San Luis Obispo, CA
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