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Design Systems: Mastering Design at Scale

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Dan Mall, Josh Clark, and myself partnered with the fine folks at InVision to create a video series called Design Systems: Mastering Design at Scale.

In the series, we share lessons learned from our experience helping organizations create and maintain successful design systems. In the 6-part series, we cover a whole bunch of topics: from getting buy-in, design system ingredients, process & cross-disciplinary collaboration, tying product and system work together with pilot projects, maintenance, and a whole lot more.

The first episode is live and the other episodes will be released over the coming months. We hope you enjoy watching the series as much as we enjoyed making it!

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emdot
4 days ago
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Signed up!
San Luis Obispo, CA
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One by one, the urgent goes away

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Those emergencies from a year ago (and a month ago), they’re gone.

Either they were solved, or they became things to live with. But emergencies don’t last. They fade.

Knowing that, knowing that you will outlast them, every single one of them, does it make it easier to see the problem, not the panic?

       
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emdot
6 days ago
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Gold. Share with your friends who freak out about everything.
San Luis Obispo, CA
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The Social Media Transformation of César Sayoc: I disagree

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In today’s New York Times, I find an article tracing the evolution of the Trump Supporter’s campaign to kill Democrats from his “normal” Facebook posts, to his “extremist” Twitter account. The article begins:

Until 2016, Cesar Altieri Sayoc Jr.’s life on social media looked unremarkable. On his Facebook page, he posted photos of decadent meals, gym workouts, scantily clad women and sports games — the stereotypical trappings of middle-age masculinity.

This may be common, but it is far from “unremarkable” as reporter Kevin Roose states.  I remarked many things about it. Then a quote from an expert in digital journalism:

“He went from posting pictures of women, real estate, dining and cars to posting pictures of ISIS, guns and people in jail,” said Jonathan Albright, the research director for Columbia University’s Tow Center for Digital Journalism. “It’s a remarkable change.”

From unremarkable to remarkable. However, here is what I remarked in the first incarnation of Mr. Sayoc’s online persona.  “Scantily clad women” denotes objectification; women as things, not people; decadent meals signal affluence and pleasure; real estate and cars are signs of prestige, money and power. All of these are signs of toxic masculinity, an idea of human relationships as transactional and impersonal, a technocratic bent, and a desire for male domination. These are completely consistent with the Twitter account, the support of Trump, and, eventually, the pipe bombs.

I’d suggest the proper way to frame this article is as a continuum of his offenses, displayed on social media. Just as many mass killers begin with domestic violence, many perverts as peeping toms; just as sexual harassers will forge expense reports, or take credit for other people’s work, the signs of violence are often visible in other actions and evidenced in seemingly minor social media posts online. “Criminal versatility” is common, and criminal tendencies can be read in early prejudices. I see the signs of César Sayoc’s tendencies already writ large on his Facebook page.


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emdot
22 days ago
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Good points!!
San Luis Obispo, CA
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Kurt Vonnegut on the Role of Artists in Society

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In times of turmoil, it can be tough to feel like the work you do to support you and your family is also nourishing to society, if you’re doing “enough”. For artists and writers at least, Kurt Vonnegut had a compelling call to duty as messengers from the near future. As part of an address to the American Physical Society published as “Physicist, Heal Thyself” in the Chicago Tribune Magazine in 1969, the author wrote:

I sometimes wondered what the use of any of the arts was. The best thing I could come up with was what I call the canary in the coal mine theory of the arts. This theory says that artists are useful to society because they are so sensitive. They are super-sensitive. They keel over like canaries in poison coal mines long before more robust types realize that there is any danger whatsoever.

He said something similar in a 1973 interview in Playboy:

Writers are specialized cells doing whatever we do, and we’re expressions of the entire society — just as the sensory cells on the surface of your body are in the service of your body as a whole. And when a society is in great danger, we’re likely to sound the alarms. I have the canary-bird-in-the-coal-mine theory of the arts. You know, coal miners used to take birds down into the mines with them to detect gas before men got sick. The artists certainly did that in the case of Vietnam. They chirped and keeled over. But it made no difference whatsoever. Nobody important cared. But I continue to think that artists — all artists — should be treasured as alarm systems.

(via nitch)

Tags: Kurt Vonnegut   working
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emdot
24 days ago
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Artists as alarm systems. AGREE!
San Luis Obispo, CA
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Social media is a symptom, not a tactic

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When your ideas are spreading, when your work is remarkable, when your organization has built a social ratchet that works, one of the side effects will be a significant social media presence. People will talk about you in ways that they like to talk… online.

On the other hand, if you spend all your time beginning at the end, grooming your social network, tweezing your Insta posts, hyping your tweets–nothing much is going to happen.

The simple proof of this is that brands with ten or twenty times the social media impact almost never have ten or twenty times as many people working as “social media specialists.”

And worth noting: The Mona Lisa has a huge social media presence. Her picture is everywhere. But she doesn’t tweet. She’s big on social media because she’s an icon, but she’s not an icon because she’s big on social media.

The narrative of social media grooming is a seductive one, but it’s as much of a dead end as spending an extra hour picking out which tie to wear before giving a speech.

       
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emdot
29 days ago
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god i want to send this all marketing people.
San Luis Obispo, CA
acdha
29 days ago
I’m now feeling old remembering having similar conversations in the 90s with people asking how to trick people into visiting their shiny new website, where it felt crazy to point out that you’d probably do better adding something more people actually want.
emdot
28 days ago
yes! exactly the same!
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Avoiding Life

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“You can not find peace by avoiding life.”
– Virginia Wolf

(via)

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emdot
30 days ago
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<3
San Luis Obispo, CA
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